DESTINY ALPACAS

DESTINY IS NOT A MATTER OF CHANCE. IT IS A MATTER OF CHOICE.

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ALPACA FACTS:

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    Just the Facts


    Alpacas are a member of the camelid family and are close relatives to camels, llamas, vicunas, and guanacos. There are two types of alpacas: the Huacaya (wa-kai-a) which is the most common type of Alpaca with a dense and highly crimped fleece that stands straight off of the body much like a sheep and the Suri (sur-ry) which has a longer staple length and has fiber which is straighter with less crimp and is soft and lustrous.Alpacas are charming, curious, friendly and playful; sometimes goofy and always unique. They need the company of other alpacas and thrive on routine. The herd shares one or two communal dung piles, so daily clean-up is easy. They communicate through soft humming and occasional spitting. One or two alpacas usually serve as leaders and will sound an alarm call, very much like a car alarm, when they sense danger.

    Basics


    Alpacas weigh 140 to 200 pounds with a head height around 5 feet, the perfect height for hugs and kisses. They have padded feet with toenails so they are earth friendly. They gently clip grass with lower front teeth against a hard upper palate and they chew cud. Males mature at 24-36 months.  Females are ready to breed at 15-24 months. Gestation is 11½ months with single births. Ovulation is induced at breeding and females are ready to be re-bred about 18 days after delivery.

    Fiber


    Alpaca fiber is luxuriously soft, several times warmer and stronger than wool, and hypo-allergenic. It comes in 22 natural colors and can easily be dyed. The fleece is shorn once a year, yielding 5 to 10 pounds per animal.  Alpaca fleece is wonderful to work with or can be sold to local spinners, co-ops and mills.  Alpaca is the natural choice for today’s eco-conscious consumer, creating luxurious yarns, scarves, hats, socks, sweaters or other accessories.

    Care


    Alpacas need little space (5 -7 per acre) and minimal shelter from wind and rain. Small feedings of a daily grain supplement, access to pasture (and/or hay), minerals and fresh water satisfy their nutritional needs. Occasional nail trimming and parasite control is needed for their basic routine care.